Tuesday, September 27, 2022

Junior MasterChef Australia

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I’ve been watching the Junior MasterChef Australia at TVB Pearl the past few weeks. The show is a cooking contest among young kids aged 8-12 who will compete as Australia’s top young chef by undergoing through cooking various recipes depending on certain criteria.

Junior MasterChef finalists Isabella and Jack.
The show takes me back when I was a kid myself. Growing up in a family fond of cooking (we used to have a carinderia), I prepare various dishes for different occasions. When going to school, I prepared lunch boxes for my younger sisters. By watching my grandma cook (she’s the best) I got to learn the noble art of cooking. So when I was tending to our small eatery, I would prepare some of the ‘signature’ dishes sought after by workers in a nearby pineapple plantation.

Unlike other reality shows where elimination takes place every week, the kids at Junior MasterChef Australia are given most chances to prove their worth and encouraged by popular hosts gifted with versatile cooking skills.

By the time I started watching the show, there were 12 remaining contestants left in the running. I was amazed by the type of dishes these kids are preparing. Among them are

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Among the 12 remaining participants is my favorite, Siena, the youngest among the group at 8 (she turned 9 by the time only four contestants were left — she’s one of them).

Two weeks after closely watching the show, the Philippine version of the show went on air via TFC. The show is hosted by Judy Ann Santos-Agoncillo and also follows the same format as the Australian. While it’s unfair to make a judgment between Pinoy Junior MasterChef and Junior MasterChef Australia based on the skill and type of dishes they cook, the Australian show got me more excited, probably because it’s already at the crucial stage, while its Philippine counterpart is still on its early stages.

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I’ve been watching the Junior MasterChef Australia at TVB Pearl the past few weeks. The show is a cooking contest among young kids aged 8-12 who will compete as Australia’s top young chef by undergoing through cooking various recipes depending on certain criteria.

Junior MasterChef finalists Isabella and Jack.
The show takes me back when I was a kid myself. Growing up in a family fond of cooking (we used to have a carinderia), I prepare various dishes for different occasions. When going to school, I prepared lunch boxes for my younger sisters. By watching my grandma cook (she’s the best) I got to learn the noble art of cooking. So when I was tending to our small eatery, I would prepare some of the ‘signature’ dishes sought after by workers in a nearby pineapple plantation.

Unlike other reality shows where elimination takes place every week, the kids at Junior MasterChef Australia are given most chances to prove their worth and encouraged by popular hosts gifted with versatile cooking skills.

By the time I started watching the show, there were 12 remaining contestants left in the running. I was amazed by the type of dishes these kids are preparing. Among them are

- Advertisement -

Among the 12 remaining participants is my favorite, Siena, the youngest among the group at 8 (she turned 9 by the time only four contestants were left — she’s one of them).

Two weeks after closely watching the show, the Philippine version of the show went on air via TFC. The show is hosted by Judy Ann Santos-Agoncillo and also follows the same format as the Australian. While it’s unfair to make a judgment between Pinoy Junior MasterChef and Junior MasterChef Australia based on the skill and type of dishes they cook, the Australian show got me more excited, probably because it’s already at the crucial stage, while its Philippine counterpart is still on its early stages.

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Pinoy Cooking is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.
Latest News

Ginisang Upo with Hipon/Pasayan

Upo is a kind of vegetable easily found everywhere in the market in the Philippines. Its English name is bottle...
- Advertisement -
More Recipes and Tips
- Advertisement -

I’ve been watching the Junior MasterChef Australia at TVB Pearl the past few weeks. The show is a cooking contest among young kids aged 8-12 who will compete as Australia’s top young chef by undergoing through cooking various recipes depending on certain criteria.

Junior MasterChef finalists Isabella and Jack.
The show takes me back when I was a kid myself. Growing up in a family fond of cooking (we used to have a carinderia), I prepare various dishes for different occasions. When going to school, I prepared lunch boxes for my younger sisters. By watching my grandma cook (she’s the best) I got to learn the noble art of cooking. So when I was tending to our small eatery, I would prepare some of the ‘signature’ dishes sought after by workers in a nearby pineapple plantation.

Unlike other reality shows where elimination takes place every week, the kids at Junior MasterChef Australia are given most chances to prove their worth and encouraged by popular hosts gifted with versatile cooking skills.

By the time I started watching the show, there were 12 remaining contestants left in the running. I was amazed by the type of dishes these kids are preparing. Among them are

- Advertisement -

Among the 12 remaining participants is my favorite, Siena, the youngest among the group at 8 (she turned 9 by the time only four contestants were left — she’s one of them).

Two weeks after closely watching the show, the Philippine version of the show went on air via TFC. The show is hosted by Judy Ann Santos-Agoncillo and also follows the same format as the Australian. While it’s unfair to make a judgment between Pinoy Junior MasterChef and Junior MasterChef Australia based on the skill and type of dishes they cook, the Australian show got me more excited, probably because it’s already at the crucial stage, while its Philippine counterpart is still on its early stages.

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
Previous articleGinataang Tulingan
Next articleBaked Creme Caramel

1 COMMENT

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Latest News

Ginisang Upo with Hipon/Pasayan

Upo is a kind of vegetable easily found everywhere in the market in the Philippines. Its English name is bottle...
- Advertisement -

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